The Influence of Race on Object Identification (#263)

Return to View Chart

How to Cite this Report

APA Style

Kelsey J. Cassidy, Chris K. Catucci, Rachel Clark, Jason C. Galarza, Bryan R. Burnham. The Influence of Race on Object Identification. (2017, May 09). Retrieved 17:33, June 28, 2017 from http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjYz

MLA Style

"The Influence of Race on Object Identification" Kelsey J. Cassidy, Chris K. Catucci, Rachel Clark, Jason C. Galarza, Bryan R. Burnham. 09 May 2017 12:50 28 Jun 2017, 17:33 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjYz>

MHRA Style

'The Influence of Race on Object Identification', Kelsey J. Cassidy, Chris K. Catucci, Rachel Clark, Jason C. Galarza, Bryan R. Burnham, , 09 May 2017 12:50 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjYz> [accessed 28 June 2017]

Chicago Style

"The Influence of Race on Object Identification", Kelsey J. Cassidy, Chris K. Catucci, Rachel Clark, Jason C. Galarza, Bryan R. Burnham, , http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjYz (accessed June 28, 2017)

CBE/CSE Style

The Influence of Race on Object Identification [Internet]. Kelsey J. Cassidy, Chris K. Catucci, Rachel Clark, Jason C. Galarza, Bryan R. Burnham; 2017 May 09, 12:50 [cited 2017 Jun 28]. Available from: http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjYz

Reference to Original Report of Finding Todd, A.R., Thiem, K.C., & Neel, R. (2016). Does seeing faces of young black boys facilitate the identification of threatening stimuli? Psychological Science, 27, 384-393. Doi: 10.1177/0956797615624492
Title The Influence of Race on Object Identification
If the original article contained multiple experiments, which one did you attempt to replicate? e.g., you might respond 'Study 1' or 'Experiment 4'. Experiment 1
Link to PDF of Original ReportView Article
Brief Statement of Original Result Participants identified weapons more quickly and misidentified objects more often after black-child primes than after white-child primes.
Type of Replication Attempted Highly Direct Replication
Result Type Failure to Replicate
Difference? No
Number of Subjects 14
Number of Subjects in Original Study 63
Year in which Replication Attempt was Made 2017
Name of Investigators (Real Names Required) Kelsey J. Cassidy, Chris K. Catucci, Rachel Clark, Jason C. Galarza, Bryan R. Burnham
Detailed Description of Method/Results Participants
A sample of 14 undergraduate, psychology 110 students at the University of Scranton participated.
Materials and Procedure
Participants completed 8 practice trials before completing another 144 trials that were recorded.
Participants were asked to complete a computerized task that presented the original stimuli used by Todd, Thiem, and Neel (2016). They were shown a face prime image and a target object image in quick succession (200 ms for each image), then asked to ignore the face prime and categorize the target object as either a toy or a gun. A pattern mask appeared on the screen until the participant responded by pressing one of two keys assigned in the beginning of the task. If participants did not respond within 500 ms, a message reading, “Please respond faster!” flashed on the screen for one second.
After completing all 144 experimental trials, participants were asked to rate the age and race/ethnicity of each of the twelve boys pictured, as well as how threatening each image seemed.

A 2 (Race Prime: Black vs. White) x 2 (Target Object: Gun vs. Toy) repeated-measures ANOVA was used to examine the influence of race prime and target objects on response time. The ANOVA did not reveal a statistically significant main effect of race prime, F(1, 11) = .905, MSE = 242.782, p = .362, 2= .076. The main effect of target object was statistically significant, F(1, 11) = 10.432, MSE = 949.289, p = .008, 2= .487. Lastly, the race prime by target object interaction was not statistically significant, F(1, 11) = .036, MSE = 184.157, p = .852, 2= .003.

Analysis of error-rate data revealed a nonsignificant main effect of race prime, F(1, 11) = .041, MSE = .004, p = .843, 2= .004. The target object main effect was also nonsignificant, F(1. 11) = 4.226, MSE = .010, p = .064, 2= .278. Lastly, the interaction between race prime and target object was also not statistically significant, F(1, 11) = .536, MSE = .004, p = .479, 2= .046.
Any Known Methodological Differences
(between original and present study)?
None
Email of Investigator
Name of individuals who
actually carried out the project
University of Scranton undergraduate students in a Research Methods Laboratory Course
Location of ProjectThe University of Scranton: Alumni Memorial Hall, room 204
Characteristics of Subjects
(subject pool, paid, etc.)
University students from subject pool
Where did these subjects reside?United States
Was this a Class Project?No
Further Details of Results as pdf
Additional Comments
Email of Original Investigator
Quantitive Information
I have complied with ethical standards for experimentation on human beings and, if necessary, have obtained appropriate permission from an Institutional Review Board or other oversight group.
TAG: Attention TAG: JDM TAG: Language TAG: Learning TAG: Memory TAG: Perception TAG: Performance TAG: Problem Solving TAG: Social Cognition TAG: Social Psychology TAG: Thinking

Are you posting an unpublished replication attempt that you conducted yourself, or noting a published replication attempt?

Post Unpublished
Post Published