The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies (#234)

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How to Cite this Report

APA Style

Samantha Jordan, Ryan McCarty, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, Lawton K. Swan. The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies. (2016, January 23). Retrieved 04:03, April 30, 2017 from http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM0

MLA Style

"The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies" Samantha Jordan, Ryan McCarty, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, Lawton K. Swan. 23 Jan 2016 22:32 30 Apr 2017, 04:03 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM0>

MHRA Style

'The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies', Samantha Jordan, Ryan McCarty, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, Lawton K. Swan, , 23 January 2016 22:32 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM0> [accessed 30 April 2017]

Chicago Style

"The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies", Samantha Jordan, Ryan McCarty, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, Lawton K. Swan, , http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM0 (accessed April 30, 2017)

CBE/CSE Style

The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies [Internet]. Samantha Jordan, Ryan McCarty, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, Lawton K. Swan; 2016 Jan 23, 22:32 [cited 2017 Apr 30]. Available from: http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM0

Reference to Original Report of Finding Norton, M. I., Anik, L., Aknin, L. B., & Dunn, E. W. (2011). Is life nasty, brutish, and short? Philosophies of life and well-being. Social Psychological and Personality Science, 2(6), 570-575.
Title The Effects of Individual Life Philosophies
If the original article contained multiple experiments, which one did you attempt to replicate? e.g., you might respond 'Study 1' or 'Experiment 4'. Study 2
Link to PDF of Original ReportView Article
Brief Statement of Original Result People who endorsed a "short and hard" life philosophy were found to have lower levels of life satisfaction and civil engagement (such as volunteering, donating money, and voting) than those who endorsed a "long and easy" life philosophy.
Type of Replication Attempted Highly Direct Replication
Result Type Successful Replication
Difference? Same Direction, .001
Number of Subjects 330
Number of Subjects in Original Study 342
Year in which Replication Attempt was Made 2014
Name of Investigators (Real Names Required) Samantha Jordan, Ryan McCarty, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, Lawton K. Swan
Detailed Description of Method/Results A sample of 356 people were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk (Mturk) service for a reimbursement amount of $0.30 each. 330 people remained for analysis (n = 330) after removing participants who had large amounts of incomplete/missing data.
After consenting to participate, each participant was asked to report whether they believed life was short or long and easy or hard. These two binary questions resulted in four types of life philosophies including short-easy, short-hard, long-easy, and long-hard. Participants then completed the 5-item Satisfaction With Life Scale (Diener et al., 1985). This Likert-type scale ranged from strongly disagree (1) to strongly agree (7). Civic engagement was then assessed using three questions, "have you volunteered for any organization in the last 2 years," "have you donated money to any organization in the last year," and "did you vote in each of the last three national elections." Participants finished the survey by filling out general demographic questions.

Our replication study found the same general relationship as Norton et al. (2011). Most participants endorsed the short-hard philosophy (56%), while the long-easy philosophy (11%) was the least popular. The short-hard philosophy was associated with lower life satisfaction (M = 4.39, SD = 1.39) than the long-easy philosophy (M = 5.73, SD = .87), t(75.676) = -7.54, p < .001, d = 1.15.

Unlike the original study, participants endorsing the short-hard philosophy reported _more_ volunteering (M = 1.66, SD = .48) than those endorsing the long-easy philosophy (M = 1.33, SD = .48), t(218) = 3.74, p < .001, d = 0.69. Also unlike the original study, we found no statistically significant difference in reported donations between short-hard respondents (M = 1.36, SD = .48) and long-easy respondents (M = 1.31, SD = .47), t(218) = .67, p = .50, as well as no significant differences in voting behaviors between individuals who endorsed the short-hard philosophy (M = 1.38, SD = .49) and those who endorsed the long-easy philosophy (M = 1.28, SD = .45), t(51.893)= 1.16, p = .25.
Any Known Methodological Differences
(between original and present study)?
None.
Email of Investigator
Name of individuals who
actually carried out the project
Samantha Jordan, Lizze Lunior, Kristen Madrid, under supervision of Lawton K Swan
Location of ProjectN/A (MTurk)
Characteristics of Subjects
(subject pool, paid, etc.)
Adults tested through internet
Adults participating through Amazon’s Mechanical Turk
Where did these subjects reside?United States
Was this a Class Project?Yes
Further Details of Results as pdf
Additional Comments
Email of Original Investigator
Quantitive Information
I have complied with ethical standards for experimentation on human beings and, if necessary, have obtained appropriate permission from an Institutional Review Board or other oversight group.
TAG: Attention TAG: JDM TAG: Language TAG: Learning TAG: Memory TAG: Perception TAG: Performance TAG: Problem Solving TAG: Social Cognition TAG: Social Psychology TAG: Thinking

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