Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians (#192)

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How to Cite this Report

APA Style

Beth Morling, Tyler Jacobs, Amanda Chasten, Samuel Katz, Emily Brooks, Taylor Maurer, Kerri Tobin, Aaron Dinkelman, Emily Schultis, Laura Niciase, Jenna Philbin, Jae Woo Chung, Elayna Caballero . Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians. (2014, June 02). Retrieved 04:56, November 22, 2017 from http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTky

MLA Style

"Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians" Beth Morling, Tyler Jacobs, Amanda Chasten, Samuel Katz, Emily Brooks, Taylor Maurer, Kerri Tobin, Aaron Dinkelman, Emily Schultis, Laura Niciase, Jenna Philbin, Jae Woo Chung, Elayna Caballero . 02 Jun 2014 19:03 22 Nov 2017, 04:56 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTky>

MHRA Style

'Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians', Beth Morling, Tyler Jacobs, Amanda Chasten, Samuel Katz, Emily Brooks, Taylor Maurer, Kerri Tobin, Aaron Dinkelman, Emily Schultis, Laura Niciase, Jenna Philbin, Jae Woo Chung, Elayna Caballero , , 02 June 2014 19:03 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTky> [accessed 22 November 2017]

Chicago Style

"Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians", Beth Morling, Tyler Jacobs, Amanda Chasten, Samuel Katz, Emily Brooks, Taylor Maurer, Kerri Tobin, Aaron Dinkelman, Emily Schultis, Laura Niciase, Jenna Philbin, Jae Woo Chung, Elayna Caballero , , http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTky (accessed November 22, 2017)

CBE/CSE Style

Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians [Internet]. Beth Morling, Tyler Jacobs, Amanda Chasten, Samuel Katz, Emily Brooks, Taylor Maurer, Kerri Tobin, Aaron Dinkelman, Emily Schultis, Laura Niciase, Jenna Philbin, Jae Woo Chung, Elayna Caballero ; 2014 Jun 02, 19:03 [cited 2017 Nov 22]. Available from: http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTky

Reference to Original Report of Finding Piff, P. K., Stancato, D. M., Côté, S., Mendoza-Denton, R., & Keltner, D. (2012). Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109, 4086-4091.
Title Car Status and Stopping for Pedestrians
If the original article contained multiple experiments, which one did you attempt to replicate? e.g., you might respond 'Study 1' or 'Experiment 4'. Study 2
Link to PDF of Original ReportView Article
Brief Statement of Original Result In the original study, Piff et al. found a positive correlation between higher vehicle status and likelihood of not stopping for pedestrians at a crosswalk.
Type of Replication Attempted Fairly Direct Replication
Result Type Successful Replication
Difference? Same Direction, p=.088
Number of Subjects 240
Number of Subjects in Original Study 152
Year in which Replication Attempt was Made 2014
Name of Investigators (Real Names Required) Beth Morling, Tyler Jacobs, Amanda Chasten, Samuel Katz, Emily Brooks, Taylor Maurer, Kerri Tobin, Aaron Dinkelman, Emily Schultis, Laura Niciase, Jenna Philbin, Jae Woo Chung, Elayna Caballero
Detailed Description of Method/Results Methods: Coding took place in three sessions; each run by different groups of students. First, students were trained coding by developing criteria for coding (1=low status to 5=high status) and practicing coding on pictures of cars in a powerpoint. An example of an “1” would be an old, beat-up Chevrolet; an example of a “2” would be a Ford or Honda with some age and wear and tear; an example of “3” be a relatively new Ford or Honda; an example of a “4” would be a new Toyota Prius or Volkswagen; an example of “5” would be a new Mercedes-Benz, Range Rover or Porsche. Two of the sessions took place during the day; the other took place at night. A confederate would look to cross the street using the crosswalk while a car was approaching the crosswalk. The car was then coded for its status (1=low status to 5=high status) by two different coders (interrater reliability r=.754) and for whether it stopped for the pedestrian or not (0=stopped, 1=did not stop). The gender of the driver was also recorded (1=male, 2=female; 140 male, 100 female).

Results: A Pearson correlation was used to determine the relationship between car status and whether a car stops for a pedestrian at crosswalks, r(240)=.11, p = .088. A graph of the percent of cars that did not stop for the pedestrian vs. car status can be seen in the figure. There was a curvilinear relationship between car status (the average of the two raters) and breaking the law. The pattern suggests that the status-lawbreaking relationship is consistent with the original article up until status =4, then drops off. Note that there were only 8 cars rated in the 5th level of the status variable.
Any Known Methodological Differences
(between original and present study)?
No known differences.
Email of Investigator
Name of individuals who
actually carried out the project
All investigators recorded and analyzed the data.
Location of ProjectAcademy Street near Perkins Student Center, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; Main Street near Grotto Pizza and North Green, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; Intersection of West Main St. and South Main St. (two crosswalks), University of Delaware
Characteristics of Subjects
(subject pool, paid, etc.)
Other
Car drivers driving through streets around the University of Delaware.
Where did these subjects reside?United States
Was this a Class Project?Yes
Further Details of Results as pdf
Additional Comments
Email of Original Investigator
Quantitive Information The data below come from our replication study; these values can be compared to Piff et al,.’s Figure 1, Panel B. Proportion of cars that did not stop for pedestrians (Status ratings averaged over the two raters) (Status 1 or 1.5)= .222; N = 27; SE=.082 (Status 2 or 2.5)= .338; N = 65; SE=.059 (Status 3 or 3.5)= .462; N = 117 ; SE=.046 (Status 4 or 4.5)= .435; N = 23; SE=.106 (Status 5) = .250 ; N = 8; SE=.164 Our correlation of r = .11 is in the same direction of Piff et al.’s relationship. The original relationship they observed was quantified at b = 0.39. In their analysis, they controlled for driver sex and age. We could not compute the same analyses because we recorded only driver sex, not age.
I have complied with ethical standards for experimentation on human beings and, if necessary, have obtained appropriate permission from an Institutional Review Board or other oversight group.
TAG: Attention TAG: JDM TAG: Language TAG: Learning TAG: Memory TAG: Perception TAG: Performance TAG: Problem Solving TAG: Social Cognition TAG: Social Psychology TAG: Thinking

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